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Posted: August 1, 2017 at 3:57 pm

Swim Guide wants to help you find the best beaches in New York for the month of August 2017. We have put together a list of beaches Swim Guide recommends based on their consistent excellent water quality (they passed water quality test more than 95% of the time in 2017), and the beaches’ popularity with our users. We’ve also confirmed that these beaches are open this summer.

Happy swimming!

The Best Beaches in New York

Passed 100% of recreational water quality tests in 2017
The Coney Island Beach is an oceanside neighborhood located at the famous Coney Island in Brooklyn, New York. It is known for its high population of Russian speaking immigrants. It is also a summer destination for New York City residents due to its beaches along the Atlantic Ocean and its proximity to the Coney Island amusement park. With nearly 3 miles of sandy beaches, Coney Island’s sunny skies and rolling waves make for the perfect getaway. With courts for beach volleyball, handball, and basketball as well as playgrounds and amusement rides, the beach and boardwalk can provide hours of entertainment. The neighborhood is directly served by a subway station. There is beach access with a large parking lot at the end of West 19th Street that leads right to the famous boardwalk lining the beach. A long fishing pier is located here and it is a popular spot for fishermen. Food and drink concessions as well as numerous restaurants and shops line the beachside area. The New York Aquarium is a great place to visit during the off-season.

Photo by Thomas Angermann

Passed 100% of recreational water quality tests in 2017
This is the Atlantic Ocean side (southside) of Breezy Point, a quiet beach community located at the western tip of the Rockaway Peninsula in Queens. Rockaway Inlet and Jamaica Bay are on the landward side. Atlantic beach accesses exist all along Oceanside Drive as well as between Beach 215th Street and Beach 227th Street. The beach is run by the Breezy Point Cooperative, which owns the entire 500 acre community in which all residents pay the maintenance, security, and community costs associated with keeping this community private. Unlike the urbanized areas of New York, Breezy Point and the Rockaway Peninsula are more peaceful and quiet, having more in common with the Hamptons and Long Island. The beaches on the Breezy Point Peninsula are home to some of the most diverse breeding shorebirds in the Metropolitan area, including the endangered Piping Plover, Common Tern, Black Skimmer and Oystercatcher. There is a shopping center with numerous restaurants, shops, and grocery stores as well as a candy shop, surf shop, gift shop and a beach bar. The Dug Out is a popular walk-up style joint that is only open during the summertime. The Breezy Point Surf Club is located here as well.
Passed 100% of recreational water quality tests in 2017
Manhattan Park Beach is a wide, crescent-shaped beach located on Brooklyn’s southern tip. It is bounded by the Atlantic Ocean to the south, Coney Island to the west, and the Kingsborough Community College Beach to the east. There is a huge parking lot located off of Oriental Boulevard. Amenities and recreational opportunities at the park and beach include an off-leash dog area, playgrounds, tennis courts, athletic fields, and a barbeque area. There are also showers and bathrooms. The beach has a lot of history, having originally opened as a summer resort in 1877. It was later opened to the public in 1955. Those interested in nature may be enticed to visit the beach during May and June when horseshoe crabs come to the shore for their mating season!
Passed 100% of recreational water quality tests in 2017
The 59th Street beach access has a large parking lot as well as a playground for children. A large boardwalk runs the length of the beach, and in 1999 for the first time in 25 years, the entire boardwalk was open to the public following a multi-million dollar restoration project. Beachgoers can enjoy newly added spray showers and scenic dunes, and the beach area is complemented by a variety of shops, restaurants, and concession stands. Bicycling is permitted after 10am except on weekends and holidays between May 1 and September 30. Lifeguards are on duty from Memorial Day through Labor Day. The boardwalk is closed between the hours of 10pm and 6am.
Passed 100% of recreational water quality tests in 2017
South Beach is one of Staten Island’s most popular attractions. Across from Brooklyn and overlooking Lower Bay, thousands of people flock to this beach and its 1.7 mile-long boardwalk to enjoy the spectacular views or for special events such as free concerts and fireworks. There are numerous beach accesses along Father Capodanno Road, the largest one being in the center. Since 1995, $20 million has been allotted for boardwalk improvements. At the north end of the boardwalk, the Dolphin Fountain is an iconic image for Staten Islanders. The boardwalk catering hall and restaurant opened in 2004, bringing visitor and economic improvements to the area. Guests can enjoy an event and a meal with beautiful views of the shoreline. The Ocean Breeze Fishing Pier opened in 2002 and is one of the largest in the city, with 835 feet of pier. It is a popular fishing spot. Located at the south end is Freedom Circle, displaying American flags from six important moments in our history. It pays special tribute to the women and men who have fought to defend our freedom over the years. Other attractions include a playground, roller hockey rink, shuffleboard courts, athletic fields, and picnic areas. You will also find the Senior Park with checkerboard tables, benches, and bocce courts.

Photo by Tommy Miles

Passed 100% of recreational water quality tests in 2017
Midland Beach is a Staten Island neighborhood that lies along the east central coast of the island. Located near South Beach and overlooking Lower Bay, this beach is the perfect spot for sunbathing and swimming. Children love the Sea Turtle Fountain, a big fountain with sprinklers in which kids can play. A variety of amenities are available including a playground, handball and shuffleboard courts, seasonal concession stands and more. Numerous free parking lot accesses run along Father Capodanno Boulevard. Miller Field is located nearby as well. Midland Beach is also the site of the Borough President’s “Back to the Beach Celebrations,” offering fun, food and games for the whole family. Sand castle building, boardwalk vendors, live music and a fireworks show are also featured. For more information call (718) 987-0709.
Passed 100% of recreational water quality tests in 2017
Orchard Beach is the Bronx’s main public beach. It is situated on the western end of Long Island Sound and part of Pelham Bay Park, covering a mile and 115 acres. It is most recognized for its unique crescent shape and beautiful views of City Island. Once referred to as the “Riviera of New York,” the park’s hexagonal-block promenade is lined with food stores and specialty shops, two playgrounds, two picnic areas, a large parking lot, a central pavilion and 26 athletic courts for basketball, volleyball, and handball. Its 13-section sandy beach draws tens of thousands of families, swimmers, athletes and loungers on hot days. On cooler days, its shores make the perfect setting for relaxing strolls. It is tremendously crowded on the weekends, so if you’re looking for a more peaceful experience visit during the week. This beach is operated by the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation.
Passed 100% of recreational water quality tests in 2017
This is the Jamaica Bay side (northside) of Breezy Point, a quiet beach community located at the western tip of the Rockaway Peninsula in Queens. Beach access and a parking lot is located at the end of Reid Avenue. The beach faces Brooklyn, New York. The Atlantic Ocean is on the southside, which also has numerous beach accesses all along Oceanside Drive as well as between Beach 215th Street and Beach 227th Street. The beach is run by the Breezy Point Cooperative, which owns the entire 500 acre communit. All residents pay the maintenance, security, and community costs associated with keeping this community private. Unlike the urbanized areas of New York, Breezy Point and the Rockaway Peninsula are more peaceful and quiet, having more in common with the Hamptons and Long Island. The beaches on the Breezy Point Peninsula are home to some of the most diverse breeding shorebirds in the Metropolitan area, including the endangered Piping Plover, Common Tern, Black Skimmer and Oystercatcher. There is a shopping center with numerous restaurants, shops, and grocery stores as well as a candy shop, surf shop, gift shop and a beach bar. The Dug Out is a popular walk-up style joint that is only open during the summertime. The Breezy Point Surf Club is located here as well.
Passed 100% of recreational water quality tests in 2017
Wolfe’s Pond Park is one of Staten Island’s largest parks, offering a beautiful beach, wildlife and plant preserve, and multi-purpose recreation area. Beach access is located on Chester Avenue and plenty of free public parking is available. Barbecuing is permitted in designated areas only (Cornelia and Luten Avenue) and is not allowed under trees. A mobile food truck and cart is located on Hylan Boulevard and Holten Avenue. Other amenities include playgrounds, hiking trails, a roller hockey rink, tennis courts, spray showers, water fountains and fishing areas. The Park maintains 14 miles of beaches, open from Memorial Day Weekend through Labor Day. Lifeguards are on duty daily and beach hours are 10am to 6pm. Swimming is prohibited at all other times. There are two ramps that can be used for wheelchair access.
Passed 100% of recreational water quality tests in 2017
Cedar Grove Beach, Staten Island’s newest beach, the fourth, opened to the public in 2011. Now in its second year, this beach has remained obscure to many Islanders. Those aware of its remote and secluded location, at the end of Ebbitts Street and Cedar Grove Avenue, hope it remains one of the Island’s secret spots. This beach was formerly a privately leased beach comprised of seaside bungalows. However the Parks Department reclaimed Cedar Grove after its lease expired in 2010, turning it into a public space. Swimming is only permitted until 6pm daily through Labor Day, when lifeguards are on duty. In years to come, they are hoping to have picnic areas, athletic fields, and other amenities you would enjoy in any city park.
Passed 100% of recreational water quality tests in 2017
Rockaway Beach is a neighborhood on the 31.5 acre Rockaway Peninsula located in Queens, New York, on the South Shore of Long Island. The beach is bounded by Arverne to the east and Rockaway Park to the west. Rockaway Beach is the largest urban beach in the United States, stretching for miles along the Rockaway Peninsula facing the Atlantic Ocean. Rockaway Beach was once known as the “Irish Riviera” because of the large Irish American population in the area. The beach is operated by the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation. Numerous beach accesses exist off of Rockaway Beach Boulevard. The Beach 116th Street access has parking right at Rockaway Park, as well as numerous other streets including Beach 113th Street and all along Shore Front Parkway between Beach 73rd Street and Beach 108th Street. There is a large boardwalk running the length of the beach, and in 1999 for the first time in 25 years, the entire boardwalk opened to the public following a multi-million dollar restoration project. Beachgoers can enjoy newly added spray showers and scenic dunes, and the beach area is complemented by a variety of shops, restaurants, and concession stands. The access on 116th Street is the final stop on the A train. Surf beaches are located between 67th-69th Streets and 87th-92th Streets. Note that additional rules apply to the surf beaches. Beach mats are available at Beach 17th Street, Beach 116th Street, and Beach 131 Street. Bicycling is permitted after 10am except on weekends and holidays between May 1 and September 30. Lifeguards are on duty from Memorial Day through Labor Day. The boardwalk is closed between the hours of 10pm and 6am.

Photo by Roman Iakoubtchik

 

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