Naikoon Provincial Park

Port Clements, British Columbia

This 69,166 hectare park is located on the northeast tip of Graham Island and features over 100 km of sandy beaches, old growth forests, and numerous bogs. It is part of the Hecate Depression and is low and flat. The weather here is mostly mild, but severe rain, wind, and fog can occur at any time. The park is accessible from Tlell and Masset at the southern and northwestern edges of the park. The coastal areas are most easily accessible while the interior of the park is a wilderness area. Agate Beach and Misty Meadows are year-round campgrounds with cold water taps and pit toilets. There are a few wilderness huts throughout the park. Back-country camping is also allowed throughout the park, and the park streams and lakes serve as an important source of drinking water.

This park is very popular in the summer and offers clamming and beach-combing, hiking, ATV driving, wildlife watching, and famous fresh and saltwater fishing. The park also boasts a diverse population introduced and native wildlife, migratory birds, and interesting sub-species of mainland birds.

WATER QUALITY
  • No data available
  • Current Status
  • This status is based on the latest sample, taken on July 17th, 2012. Fraser Riverkeeper updates the status of this beach as soon as test results become available. These results were posted to Swim Guide on at
For water quality icon legend, click:   
CURRENT WEATHER
12°C
Chance of heavy rain
MONITORING FREQUENCY

Naikoon Provincial Park is not sampled

SOURCE INFORMATION

Northern Health's responsibility in Northern British Columbia is from the Queen Charlotte Islands to the Alberta border, and as far south as Quesnel. There is a map of Northern Health’s jurisdictional boundaries on the Northern Health website at https://northernhealth.ca/AboutUs.aspx

British Columbia health departments select and test water quality found at primary (swimming) and secondary (non-swimming) contact beaches across the province, following the Canadian Recreational Water Quality Guidelines. Most health departments in the interior test for E. coli from May to September (except for Vancouver Island Health Authority, which tests from June to September). Samples are collected weekly with a minimum of 5 test samples collected in a month. Warnings are posted by Fraser Riverkeeper if the 30-day geometric mean rises above 100 E. coli / 100 ml of water. There is currently no regular monitoring of these beaches.

WATER QUALITY GRAPH

Naikoon Provincial Park

Port Clements, British Columbia

WATER QUALITY
  • No data available
  • Current Status
  • This status is based on the latest sample, taken on July 17th, 2012. Fraser Riverkeeper updates the status of this beach as soon as test results become available. These results were posted to Swim Guide on at
For water quality icon legend, click:   
CURRENT WEATHER
12°C
Chance of heavy rain

This 69,166 hectare park is located on the northeast tip of Graham Island and features over 100 km of sandy beaches, old growth forests, and numerous bogs. It is part of the Hecate Depression and is low and flat. The weather here is mostly mild, but severe rain, wind, and fog can occur at any time. The park is accessible from Tlell and Masset at the southern and northwestern edges of the park. The coastal areas are most easily accessible while the interior of the park is a wilderness area. Agate Beach and Misty Meadows are year-round campgrounds with cold water taps and pit toilets. There are a few wilderness huts throughout the park. Back-country camping is also allowed throughout the park, and the park streams and lakes serve as an important source of drinking water.

This park is very popular in the summer and offers clamming and beach-combing, hiking, ATV driving, wildlife watching, and famous fresh and saltwater fishing. The park also boasts a diverse population introduced and native wildlife, migratory birds, and interesting sub-species of mainland birds.

MONITORING FREQUENCY

Naikoon Provincial Park is not sampled

SOURCE INFORMATION

Northern Health's responsibility in Northern British Columbia is from the Queen Charlotte Islands to the Alberta border, and as far south as Quesnel. There is a map of Northern Health’s jurisdictional boundaries on the Northern Health website at https://northernhealth.ca/AboutUs.aspx

British Columbia health departments select and test water quality found at primary (swimming) and secondary (non-swimming) contact beaches across the province, following the Canadian Recreational Water Quality Guidelines. Most health departments in the interior test for E. coli from May to September (except for Vancouver Island Health Authority, which tests from June to September). Samples are collected weekly with a minimum of 5 test samples collected in a month. Warnings are posted by Fraser Riverkeeper if the 30-day geometric mean rises above 100 E. coli / 100 ml of water. There is currently no regular monitoring of these beaches.

WATER QUALITY GRAPH



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