Danielson Provincial Park Public Beach at Lake Diefenbaker


Lake Diefenbaker was formed in 1968 by damming of the South Saskatchewan River. It is about 2km wide and over 100km long and has 3 Saskatchewan Provincial Parks on its perimeter. In Danielson Provincial Park, the public beach alone is several kilometers in length, and you can find even more sandy beaches along the shoreline. The beach is composed of coarse light sand mixed with rocks. It is rockier the further you get upland from the water. Potash and other minerals occur commonly in these sediments, giving the sand a sparkling pink appearance. The lake bottom is a mixture of sand and rocks, and deepens gradually leaving plenty of space for wading and swimming. The water is cold and clear, with no evidence of weeds growing or washed up. There may or may not be a designated swimming area depending on the water level, and all swimming is unsupervised.

Access to the beach is off of highway 44, and parking is available at the Danielson Provincial Park Visitor Center. The parking lot is a short walk through a grassy park to the beach. Lake Diefenbaker is historical to say the least! It is known for stories of it’s formation, it’s hydroelectric power production, and it’s record breaking fish populations. All of these things make it a desirable lake to visit, and the abundance of boaters and recreational users are proof of that! There is a boat launch available through the park but you must pay an entry fee to use that facility. Because a dam controls the lake, the size of the beach fluctuates with the water levels throughout the season. It’s gradual slope and sandy perimeter don’t provide much cover from the sun, so make sure to bring sun screen!

The view from the beach is mainly more beaches, bordered by trees and valleys. Near shore there is a small sandy island, and a large colony of pelicans can be easily observed from the beach! The beach backs onto a grassy park and several trees. This area has a small playground for kids, change houses and washrooms, as well as day use picnic tables and benches. The visitor center is also in this park and features displays on historical Lake Diefenbaker as well as a small theatre, store, and restaurant. All in all, historical Lake Diefenbaker is a must see!

QUALITÉ DE L’EAU
  • Aucune donnée actuelle
  • Statut Actuel
Légende de qualité de l’eau:   
MÉTÉO ACTUELLE
2°C
Ciel dégagé
FRÉQUENCE DE SURVEILLANCE

La qualité de l’eau de cette plage n’est pas vérifiée

SOURCES

The public, recreational beaches of Saskatchewan are not routinely monitored, sampled or tested for recreational water quality standards and exceedances during the bathing season. Saskatchewan Public Health may sample swimming areas in response to complaints or observed reports. If you have a complaint, please use the "Report Pollution" button in Swim Guide.

North Saskatchewan Riverkeeper has identified swimming locations and added them to Swim Guide. Beaches will remain "Grey" if no reliable water quality data is available.

QUALITÉ DE L’EAU

Danielson Provincial Park Public Beach at Lake Diefenbaker


QUALITÉ DE L’EAU
  • Aucune donnée actuelle
  • Statut Actuel
Légende de qualité de l’eau:   
MÉTÉO ACTUELLE
2°C
Ciel dégagé

Lake Diefenbaker was formed in 1968 by damming of the South Saskatchewan River. It is about 2km wide and over 100km long and has 3 Saskatchewan Provincial Parks on its perimeter. In Danielson Provincial Park, the public beach alone is several kilometers in length, and you can find even more sandy beaches along the shoreline. The beach is composed of coarse light sand mixed with rocks. It is rockier the further you get upland from the water. Potash and other minerals occur commonly in these sediments, giving the sand a sparkling pink appearance. The lake bottom is a mixture of sand and rocks, and deepens gradually leaving plenty of space for wading and swimming. The water is cold and clear, with no evidence of weeds growing or washed up. There may or may not be a designated swimming area depending on the water level, and all swimming is unsupervised.

Access to the beach is off of highway 44, and parking is available at the Danielson Provincial Park Visitor Center. The parking lot is a short walk through a grassy park to the beach. Lake Diefenbaker is historical to say the least! It is known for stories of it’s formation, it’s hydroelectric power production, and it’s record breaking fish populations. All of these things make it a desirable lake to visit, and the abundance of boaters and recreational users are proof of that! There is a boat launch available through the park but you must pay an entry fee to use that facility. Because a dam controls the lake, the size of the beach fluctuates with the water levels throughout the season. It’s gradual slope and sandy perimeter don’t provide much cover from the sun, so make sure to bring sun screen!

The view from the beach is mainly more beaches, bordered by trees and valleys. Near shore there is a small sandy island, and a large colony of pelicans can be easily observed from the beach! The beach backs onto a grassy park and several trees. This area has a small playground for kids, change houses and washrooms, as well as day use picnic tables and benches. The visitor center is also in this park and features displays on historical Lake Diefenbaker as well as a small theatre, store, and restaurant. All in all, historical Lake Diefenbaker is a must see!

FRÉQUENCE DE SURVEILLANCE

La qualité de l’eau de cette plage n’est pas vérifiée

SOURCES

The public, recreational beaches of Saskatchewan are not routinely monitored, sampled or tested for recreational water quality standards and exceedances during the bathing season. Saskatchewan Public Health may sample swimming areas in response to complaints or observed reports. If you have a complaint, please use the "Report Pollution" button in Swim Guide.

North Saskatchewan Riverkeeper has identified swimming locations and added them to Swim Guide. Beaches will remain "Grey" if no reliable water quality data is available.

QUALITÉ DE L’EAU



Swim Guide divulgue les meilleures données que nous possédons au moment où vous voulez les consulter. Obéissez toujours aux avis affichés sur les plages ou diffusés par les organismes gouvernementaux. Restez vigilant et vérifiez s’il y a d’autres risques pour les baigneurs, comme les marées et les courants dangereux. Veuillez signaler les cas de pollution qui vous préoccupent pour que les affiliés puissent assurer la sécurité des personnes qui fréquentent les plages.

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