Cameron Heights

Edmonton, Alberta

Photo by: Dylan Neild

The North Saskatchewan River is heralded by many as the "Heart of the Capital Region". This grand body of water begins its journey in the Rocky Mountains and meanders into Edmonton from the Southwest, making its way through Cameron Heights and moving onward toward the downtown.

The North Saskatchewan boasts plentiful fishing and is wildly popular among paddling enthusiasts along its entire length – right from the Bighorn Dam 400 kilometres upstream and into the heart of the City of Edmonton.

WATER QUALITY
  • Passed water quality tests 60-95% of the time
  • Historical Status
  • This status is based on the latest sample, taken on . North Saskatchewan Riverkeeper updates the status of this beach as soon as test results become available. These results were posted to Swim Guide on at
For water quality icon legend, click:   
MONITORING FREQUENCY

is sampled weekly from 1 January to 31 December

SOURCE INFORMATION

E. coli levels measured at the Edmonton’s water supply intakes are included in Swim Guide as a reference point for recreational water users. River water is generally cleanest mid-stream (the location of the intakes), and users should note that water quality may be poorer in other parts of the river, such as along the shoreline depending on the nature of stormwater and wastewater discharges within the City of Edmonton.

EPCOR tests for a number of parameters including E. coli at Edmonton’s two Water Treatment Plant intakes in the North Saskatchewan River. Water enters the mid-stream intakes and is carried by pipe to the treatment plant. After passing through a coarse filter, or grate, that prevents larger debris from entering the intake, the water travels through a pipe and is then tested prior to any treatment and as close to the intake as possible. EPCOR conducts additional testing after the water has been treated to ensure that drinking water is safe for consumers.

EPCOR uses a standard Idexx method to process the raw water samples and test for E. coli. Only one sample is taken on each test day, and as such, Swim Guide compares results against Health Canada’s single-sample limit of 400 CFU/100ml (colony forming units of E. coli per 100 millilitres of water). When E. coli levels are less than or equal to 400 CFU/100ml, the site is posted green by Swim Guide. When E. coli levels exceed 400 CFU/100ml, the site is posted red.

For inquiries regarding this protocol, please contact Hans Asfeldt of the North Saskatchewan Riverkeeper directly via the organization’s website: http://saskriverkeeper.ca/?page_id=287

WATER QUALITY GRAPH

Cameron Heights

Edmonton, Alberta

WATER QUALITY
  • Passed water quality tests 60-95% of the time
  • Historical Status
  • This status is based on the latest sample, taken on . North Saskatchewan Riverkeeper updates the status of this beach as soon as test results become available. These results were posted to Swim Guide on at
For water quality icon legend, click:   
Photo by: Dylan Neild

The North Saskatchewan River is heralded by many as the "Heart of the Capital Region". This grand body of water begins its journey in the Rocky Mountains and meanders into Edmonton from the Southwest, making its way through Cameron Heights and moving onward toward the downtown.

The North Saskatchewan boasts plentiful fishing and is wildly popular among paddling enthusiasts along its entire length – right from the Bighorn Dam 400 kilometres upstream and into the heart of the City of Edmonton.

MONITORING FREQUENCY

is sampled weekly from 1 January to 31 December

SOURCE INFORMATION

E. coli levels measured at the Edmonton’s water supply intakes are included in Swim Guide as a reference point for recreational water users. River water is generally cleanest mid-stream (the location of the intakes), and users should note that water quality may be poorer in other parts of the river, such as along the shoreline depending on the nature of stormwater and wastewater discharges within the City of Edmonton.

EPCOR tests for a number of parameters including E. coli at Edmonton’s two Water Treatment Plant intakes in the North Saskatchewan River. Water enters the mid-stream intakes and is carried by pipe to the treatment plant. After passing through a coarse filter, or grate, that prevents larger debris from entering the intake, the water travels through a pipe and is then tested prior to any treatment and as close to the intake as possible. EPCOR conducts additional testing after the water has been treated to ensure that drinking water is safe for consumers.

EPCOR uses a standard Idexx method to process the raw water samples and test for E. coli. Only one sample is taken on each test day, and as such, Swim Guide compares results against Health Canada’s single-sample limit of 400 CFU/100ml (colony forming units of E. coli per 100 millilitres of water). When E. coli levels are less than or equal to 400 CFU/100ml, the site is posted green by Swim Guide. When E. coli levels exceed 400 CFU/100ml, the site is posted red.

For inquiries regarding this protocol, please contact Hans Asfeldt of the North Saskatchewan Riverkeeper directly via the organization’s website: http://saskriverkeeper.ca/?page_id=287

WATER QUALITY GRAPH



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