Key Biscayne Beach Club - Miami Waterkeeper

Key Biscayne, Florida

Due to COVID-19, Miami Waterkeeper is using recommendations from CDC saying please avoid crowded beaches and practice social distancing.

With Biscayne Bay to the west, and the Atlantic Ocean to the east, and in close proximity to state, county, and city parks, the Village of Key Biscayne has been a popular tourist and recreational destination for decades. The Key Biscayne Beach Club lies on the eastern, seaward side of the island. Built in 1958, the Beach Club has served as a central meeting point for the Key Biscayne community for generations, and has been designated a Miami-Dade Historic Site.

The Club is private property, open only to members and their guests.

COVID-19

Keep your distance from other people.

Practicing social distancing is essential right now. Follow the advice of the health experts. If your community has asked that you remain indoors and away from others, do so. Heading to the beach should only be considered an option if social distancing practices can be followed. Spending a day in any crowded place is the worst thing we can do for our most vulnerable right now and will counter the efforts to curb the virus’ spread.

For more information, please visit the World Health Organization public resource on COVID-19.

Water Quality
  • Special health or safety status in effect

  • Special Status
  • This means the affiliate organization managing a beach has set the beach status based on special local knowledge or information. Check the beach description and the Sources section for details.
For water quality icon legend, click:  
Monitoring Frequency

Key Biscayne Beach Club - Miami Waterkeeper is sampled weekly from January 1st from December 31st.

Source Information

Miami Waterkeeper created its Water Quality Monitoring Program to test areas of Biscayne Bay that were not significantly continuously monitored by the Florida Department of Health's Healthy Beaches program, but which saw significant recreational activities that put the public in contact with the Bay. Partnering with local institutions like Ransom Everglades as part of our educational outreach activities, Miami Waterkeeper measures sampled waters for enterococcus, a bacteria frequently associated with sewage, and which can both cause gastrointestinal problems itself, as well as serve as an indicator that other sewage-related pathogens are in the area. Monitoring results are collected on Monday, and results are posted to Swim Guide on Tuesday when they become available.

Miami Waterkeeper follows guidance contained in the US Environmental Protection Agency's Recreational Water Quality Criteria, as well as in the sampling protocols developed by the Florida Department of Health. Following the Healthy Beaches protocol, we designate sample sites by water quality in terms of the number of enterococci per 100 mL. Sampling results are categorized as follows:Good: 0-35 Enterococci per 100 ml of marine water Moderate: 36-70 Enterococci per 100 ml of marine water Poor (unsatisfactory): 71 or greater Enterococci per 100 ml of marine waterGood and moderate results are designated as "pass" or green on Swim Guide. Sites showing 71 or greater enterococci per 100 mL of marine water are designated as "fail" and marked in red.Sites designated as red should not be swum in, and recreational boaters, kayakers, and paddleboarders should avoid contact with the water to the extent possible. Enterococci is not the only potentially dangerous bacteria in the water; you should also be careful of Vibrio vulinificus, known popularly as flesh-eating bacteria, which occurs naturally in some Florida waters, including in South Florida. Avoid swimming in the ocean, particularly near areas where canals or rivers enter the ocean, if you have open cuts on your skin, or impaired liver function.Miami Waterkeeper also posts results from the Florida Department of Health's Healthy Beaches program for those sites on Swim Guide as they become available. Finally, if local governments or Miami Waterkeeper determine a no swim advisory or beach closure is necessary to do other contamination issues (for example, a sewage leak or red tide), we mark those beaches as a red "special status" and advise against swimming as well.***DISCLAIMER*** Water quality advisories issued by Miami Waterkeeper, a non-profit organization, are meant to be complementary and supplemental to advisories issued by government agencies. Any advisories issued by Miami Waterkeeper are the result of field sampling and analysis by Miami Waterkeeper, not a research institute or government agency. They are non-binding and do not supersede advisories issued by government agencies. Miami Waterkeeper advisories are informational and are not intended as health advice. The decision to risk contact with recreational water rests entirely with the individual.

Water Quality Graph

Key Biscayne Beach Club - Miami Waterkeeper

Key Biscayne, Florida

COVID-19

Keep your distance from other people.

Practicing social distancing is essential right now. Follow the advice of the health experts. If your community has asked that you remain indoors and away from others, do so. Heading to the beach should only be considered an option if social distancing practices can be followed. Spending a day in any crowded place is the worst thing we can do for our most vulnerable right now and will counter the efforts to curb the virus’ spread.

For more information, please visit the World Health Organization public resource on COVID-19.

Water Quality
  • Special health or safety status in effect
  • Special Status
  • This means the affiliate organization managing a beach has set the beach status based on special local knowledge or information. Check the beach description and the Sources section for details.
For water quality icon legend, click:  

Due to COVID-19, Miami Waterkeeper is using recommendations from CDC saying please avoid crowded beaches and practice social distancing.

With Biscayne Bay to the west, and the Atlantic Ocean to the east, and in close proximity to state, county, and city parks, the Village of Key Biscayne has been a popular tourist and recreational destination for decades. The Key Biscayne Beach Club lies on the eastern, seaward side of the island. Built in 1958, the Beach Club has served as a central meeting point for the Key Biscayne community for generations, and has been designated a Miami-Dade Historic Site.

The Club is private property, open only to members and their guests.

Monitoring Frequency

Key Biscayne Beach Club - Miami Waterkeeper is sampled weekly from January 1st from December 31st.

Source Information

Miami Waterkeeper created its Water Quality Monitoring Program to test areas of Biscayne Bay that were not significantly continuously monitored by the Florida Department of Health's Healthy Beaches program, but which saw significant recreational activities that put the public in contact with the Bay. Partnering with local institutions like Ransom Everglades as part of our educational outreach activities, Miami Waterkeeper measures sampled waters for enterococcus, a bacteria frequently associated with sewage, and which can both cause gastrointestinal problems itself, as well as serve as an indicator that other sewage-related pathogens are in the area. Monitoring results are collected on Monday, and results are posted to Swim Guide on Tuesday when they become available.

Miami Waterkeeper follows guidance contained in the US Environmental Protection Agency's Recreational Water Quality Criteria, as well as in the sampling protocols developed by the Florida Department of Health. Following the Healthy Beaches protocol, we designate sample sites by water quality in terms of the number of enterococci per 100 mL. Sampling results are categorized as follows:Good: 0-35 Enterococci per 100 ml of marine water Moderate: 36-70 Enterococci per 100 ml of marine water Poor (unsatisfactory): 71 or greater Enterococci per 100 ml of marine waterGood and moderate results are designated as "pass" or green on Swim Guide. Sites showing 71 or greater enterococci per 100 mL of marine water are designated as "fail" and marked in red.Sites designated as red should not be swum in, and recreational boaters, kayakers, and paddleboarders should avoid contact with the water to the extent possible. Enterococci is not the only potentially dangerous bacteria in the water; you should also be careful of Vibrio vulinificus, known popularly as flesh-eating bacteria, which occurs naturally in some Florida waters, including in South Florida. Avoid swimming in the ocean, particularly near areas where canals or rivers enter the ocean, if you have open cuts on your skin, or impaired liver function.Miami Waterkeeper also posts results from the Florida Department of Health's Healthy Beaches program for those sites on Swim Guide as they become available. Finally, if local governments or Miami Waterkeeper determine a no swim advisory or beach closure is necessary to do other contamination issues (for example, a sewage leak or red tide), we mark those beaches as a red "special status" and advise against swimming as well.***DISCLAIMER*** Water quality advisories issued by Miami Waterkeeper, a non-profit organization, are meant to be complementary and supplemental to advisories issued by government agencies. Any advisories issued by Miami Waterkeeper are the result of field sampling and analysis by Miami Waterkeeper, not a research institute or government agency. They are non-binding and do not supersede advisories issued by government agencies. Miami Waterkeeper advisories are informational and are not intended as health advice. The decision to risk contact with recreational water rests entirely with the individual.

Water Quality Graph

  Beach Location Water Quality
Key Biscayne, Florida
Key Biscayne, Florida
Miami, Florida
Key Biscayne, Florida
Swim Guide
is supported by
* The RBC Foundation

Swim Guide shares the best information we have at the moment you ask for it. Always obey signs at the beach or advisories from official government agencies. Stay alert and check for other swimming hazards such as dangerous currents and tides. Please report your pollution concerns so Affiliates can help keep other beach-goers safe.

Swim Guide, "Swim Drink Fish icons," and associated trademarks are owned by SWIM DRINK FISH CANADA. See Legal.

© SWIM DRINK FISH CANADA, 2011 - 2020