Biscayne Nature Center

Key Biscayne, Florida

Marjory Stoneman Douglas Biscayne Nature Center is located in Crandon Park on the island of Key Biscayne, overlooking the dunes and the ocean, and dedicated to the conservation of local resources. The Center offers a reception area, exhibit spaces showing the natural beauty of the area, a gift shop, demonstration lab classroom facilities, and an audio visual presentation room.

WATER QUALITY
  • Meets water quality standards
  • Current Status
  • This status is based on the latest sample, taken on August 19th, 2019. Miami Waterkeeper updates the status of this beach as soon as test results become available. These results were posted to Swim Guide on at
For water quality icon legend, click:   
MONITORING FREQUENCY

Biscayne Nature Center is sampled weekly from January 1st to December 31st

SOURCE INFORMATION

Miami Waterkeeper created its Water Quality Monitoring Program to test areas of Biscayne Bay that were not significantly continuously monitored by the Florida Department of Health's Healthy Beaches program, but which saw significant recreational activities that put the public in contact with the Bay.

Partnering with local institutions like Ransom Everglades as part of our educational outreach activities, Miami Waterkeeper measures sampled waters for enterococcus, a bacteria frequently associated with sewage, and which can both cause gastrointestinal problems itself, as well as serve as an indicator that other sewage-related pathogens are in the area. Monitoring results are collected on Monday, and results are posted to Swim Guide on Tuesday when they become available.

Miami Waterkeeper follows guidance contained in the US Environmental Protection Agency's Recreational Water Quality Criteria, as well as in the sampling protocols developed by the Florida Department of Health. Following the Healthy Beaches protocol, we designate sample sites by water quality in terms of the number of enterococci per 100 mL. Sampling results are categorized as follows:

Good: 0-35 Enterococci per 100 ml of marine water
Moderate: 36-70 Enterococci per 100 ml of marine water
Poor (unsatisfactory): 71 or greater Enterococci per 100 ml of marine water

Good and moderate results are designated as "pass" or green on Swim Guide. Sites showing 71 or greater enterococci per 100 mL of marine water are designated as "fail" and marked in red.

Sites designated as red should not be swum in, and recreational boaters, kayakers, and paddleboarders should avoid contact with the water to the extent possible. Enterococci is not the only potentially dangerous bacteria in the water; you should also be careful of Vibrio vulinificus, known popularly as flesh-eating bacteria, which occurs naturally in some Florida waters, including in South Florida. Avoid swimming in the ocean, particularly near areas where canals or rivers enter the ocean, if you have open cuts on your skin, or impaired liver function.

Miami Waterkeeper also posts results from the Florida Department of Health's Healthy Beaches program for those sites on Swim Guide as they become available. Finally, if local governments or Miami Waterkeeper determine a no swim advisory or beach closure is necessary to do other contamination issues (for example, a sewage leak or red tide), we mark those beaches as a red "special status" and advise against swimming as well.

WATER QUALITY GRAPH

Biscayne Nature Center

Key Biscayne, Florida

WATER QUALITY
  • Meets water quality standards
  • Current Status
  • This status is based on the latest sample, taken on August 19th, 2019. Miami Waterkeeper updates the status of this beach as soon as test results become available. These results were posted to Swim Guide on at
For water quality icon legend, click:   

Marjory Stoneman Douglas Biscayne Nature Center is located in Crandon Park on the island of Key Biscayne, overlooking the dunes and the ocean, and dedicated to the conservation of local resources. The Center offers a reception area, exhibit spaces showing the natural beauty of the area, a gift shop, demonstration lab classroom facilities, and an audio visual presentation room.

MONITORING FREQUENCY

Biscayne Nature Center is sampled weekly from January 1st to December 31st

SOURCE INFORMATION

Miami Waterkeeper created its Water Quality Monitoring Program to test areas of Biscayne Bay that were not significantly continuously monitored by the Florida Department of Health's Healthy Beaches program, but which saw significant recreational activities that put the public in contact with the Bay.

Partnering with local institutions like Ransom Everglades as part of our educational outreach activities, Miami Waterkeeper measures sampled waters for enterococcus, a bacteria frequently associated with sewage, and which can both cause gastrointestinal problems itself, as well as serve as an indicator that other sewage-related pathogens are in the area. Monitoring results are collected on Monday, and results are posted to Swim Guide on Tuesday when they become available.

Miami Waterkeeper follows guidance contained in the US Environmental Protection Agency's Recreational Water Quality Criteria, as well as in the sampling protocols developed by the Florida Department of Health. Following the Healthy Beaches protocol, we designate sample sites by water quality in terms of the number of enterococci per 100 mL. Sampling results are categorized as follows:

Good: 0-35 Enterococci per 100 ml of marine water
Moderate: 36-70 Enterococci per 100 ml of marine water
Poor (unsatisfactory): 71 or greater Enterococci per 100 ml of marine water

Good and moderate results are designated as "pass" or green on Swim Guide. Sites showing 71 or greater enterococci per 100 mL of marine water are designated as "fail" and marked in red.

Sites designated as red should not be swum in, and recreational boaters, kayakers, and paddleboarders should avoid contact with the water to the extent possible. Enterococci is not the only potentially dangerous bacteria in the water; you should also be careful of Vibrio vulinificus, known popularly as flesh-eating bacteria, which occurs naturally in some Florida waters, including in South Florida. Avoid swimming in the ocean, particularly near areas where canals or rivers enter the ocean, if you have open cuts on your skin, or impaired liver function.

Miami Waterkeeper also posts results from the Florida Department of Health's Healthy Beaches program for those sites on Swim Guide as they become available. Finally, if local governments or Miami Waterkeeper determine a no swim advisory or beach closure is necessary to do other contamination issues (for example, a sewage leak or red tide), we mark those beaches as a red "special status" and advise against swimming as well.

WATER QUALITY GRAPH



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