South Point Park - Miami Beach

Miami Beach, Florida

This site is sampled by the Department of Health (DOH) (http://www.floridahealth.gov/environmental-health/beach-water-quality) and the Surfrider Foundation Miami Chapter (https://miami.surfrider.org).

Known to locals as one of the better places to catch some (small) waves, the world famous South Beach in the cool neighborhood of SOFI (south of 5th) in South Miami Beach, is home to some of area's best restaurants, hotels, and bars as well as high priced real estate. One of the most popular beaches in Miami Beach, South Beach is also right next door to the newly renovated South Pointe Park, where Miami Beach proper ends - or begins - depending on which way you are heading. With restroom amenities 20-foot-wide walkways lined with Florida limestone and restored natural sand dunes, covered with grass, children can play in spouting a spouting water exhibit to cool off. Check out an amazing sunset, sunrise or have a meal at one of the local eateries. There are surf shops with equipment rentals close by. Watch cruise ships set sail for an ocean voyage from the adjacent government cut channel, or head up the beach to 5th street and Ocean, where the fantastic art deco hotels line Ocean Drive. Rent a bike and cruise the boardwalk and take in great people watching, beach volleyball and people from all over the world having a blast.

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Conocido por los lugareños como uno de los mejores lugares para tomar olas (pequeñas), la mundialmente famosa South Beach en el sensacional barrio de SOFI (al sur de la 5ta) en South Miami Beach, es el hogar de algunos de los mejores restaurantes, hoteles y bares de la zona, así como de bienes inmuebles de alto precio. Una de las playas más populares de Miami Beach, South Beach, también está justo al lado del parque South Pointe, recientemente renovado, donde Miami Beach termina o comienza apropiadamente dependiendo de hacia dónde se dirija. Con servicios de baños, pasarelas de 20 pies de ancho revestidas con piedra caliza de la Florida y dunas de arena natural restauradas, cubiertas de hierba, los niños pueden jugar en una exhibición de chorros de agua para refrescarse. Vea una increíble puesta de sol, el amanecer o disfrute de una comida en uno de los restaurantes locales. Hay tiendas de surf con alquiler de equipos cerca. Mire los cruceros zarpar para un viaje por mar desde el canal adyacente cortado por el gobierno, o diríjase a la playa hasta la calle 5 y Ocean, donde se encuentran los fantásticos hoteles art déco de Ocean Drive. Alquila una bicicleta y recorre el paseo marítimo y disfruta de la observación de la gente, el voleibol de playa y la gente de todo el mundo divirtiéndose.

COVID-19

Keep your distance from other people.

Practicing social distancing is still essential. Only go to the beach if you are able to keep 6 feet or 2 meters away from others. Follow the instructions provided by your local health authorities. If your community has asked that you remain indoors and away from others, do so. Spending a day in any crowded place is the worst thing we can do for our most vulnerable right now and will counter our efforts to curb the virus’s spread.

Water Quality
  • Meets water quality standards

  • Current Status
  • This status is based on the latest sample, taken on November 28th, 2022. Miami Waterkeeper updates the status of this beach as soon as test results become available. These results were posted to Swim Guide on November 29th, 2022 at 6:41 PM.
For water quality icon legend, click:  
Monitoring Frequency

South Point Park - Miami Beach is sampled weekly from January 1st to December 31st.

Source Information

Water quality results displayed is region are collected weekly (typically Mondays) by the Florida Department of Health’s (DOH) Florida Healthy Beaches (FHB) program (http://www.floridahealth.gov/environmental-health/beach-water-quality).

These sites are also sampled (typically Thursdays) by Surfrider Foundation Miami Chapter (https://miami.surfrider.org).

The information is updated on Swim Guide by Miami Waterkeeper (www.miamiwaterkeeper.org), a local nonprofit focused on ensuring clean water. Miami Waterkeeper enters Swim Guide data for both Miami-Dade County and Broward County’s DOH.

Analysis Protocol:
Samples are collected weekly to test for levels of enterococci, a type of bacteria that indicates that pathogenic bacteria and viruses associated with fecal pollution may be present. These bacteria are known as fecal indicator bacteria (FIB). Analysis of samples takes 24 hours to culture before results are available. All local sampling programs on Swim Guide also use the thresholds for water quality as written in the Florida Administrative Code, based on the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)’s 2012 Recreational Water Quality Criteria: Good= 0-35 CFU/MPN enterococci / 100 mL of marine water; Moderate= 36-69 CFU/MPN enterococci / 100 mL of marine water; and Poor= 70 CFU/MPN or greater enterococci / 100 mL of marine water. Clicking the pie chart icon will reveal a summary of the prior yearly or monthly of pass/fail data. A sampling location is marked GREY when no current or reliable monitoring information is available.

Testing sites are resampled by DOH after a failed water quality test until conditions return to safe levels. The DOH will only issue a formal “swim advisory” after two failed tests in a row, but Miami Waterkeeper will mark a beach as “RED” on Swim Guide after a single failed test is reported by any of the sampling organizations, if the data is posted by DOH. These conservative advisories inform vulnerable people (children, elderly, and the immunocompromised) who have elevated health risks due to water quality at the beach.

Miami Waterkeeper will also mark a beach as "Special Status" if information comes from other sources indicating that the water is unsafe, for example, a sewage leak, red tide, or oil spill. If data is more than a week old, sites will show a historical record of water quality data from a given site.

Program Goals:
The Department of Health’s Florida Healthy Beaches program is a state-run initiative in partnership with Miami-Dade County and 33 other coastal counties in the state of Florida. The Florida Healthy Beaches program has been collecting and analyzing water samples from beaches and reporting FIB levels since 2000.

Surfrider Miami Chapter's program was designed to augment the water quality data of the Department of Health's Florida Healthy Beaches Program, which samples beaches within Miami Dade County each Monday. Surfrider Miami samples most of these same locations each Thursday, providing more up-to-date water quality information to protect public health at the beach, and provide data to local policy makers in an effort to alter public policy to improve water quality across the area.

Miami Waterkeeper’s Water Quality Monitoring program is run by full-time investigators and staff that sample common recreation sites on a weekly basis to ensure the water you love is clean and safe. This program aims to sample locations not currently sampled by the Florida Healthy Beaches program or Surfrider Miami in an attempt to fill in gaps in local water quality monitoring. Visit Miami Waterkeeper at www.miamiwaterkeeper.org/water_monitoring or email hello@miamiwaterkeeper.org if you have any additional questions or to view a complete set of monitoring data.

Read more
Water Quality Graph

South Point Park - Miami Beach

Miami Beach, Florida

COVID-19

Keep your distance from other people.

Practicing social distancing is still essential. Only go to the beach if you are able to keep 6 feet or 2 meters away from others. Follow the instructions provided by your local health authorities. If your community has asked that you remain indoors and away from others, do so. Spending a day in any crowded place is the worst thing we can do for our most vulnerable right now and will counter our efforts to curb the virus’s spread.

Water Quality
  • Meets water quality standards
  • Current Status
  • This status is based on the latest sample, taken on November 28th, 2022. Miami Waterkeeper updates the status of this beach as soon as test results become available. These results were posted to Swim Guide on November 29th, 2022 at 6:41 PM.
For water quality icon legend, click:  

This site is sampled by the Department of Health (DOH) (http://www.floridahealth.gov/environmental-health/beach-water-quality) and the Surfrider Foundation Miami Chapter (https://miami.surfrider.org).

Known to locals as one of the better places to catch some (small) waves, the world famous South Beach in the cool neighborhood of SOFI (south of 5th) in South Miami Beach, is home to some of area's best restaurants, hotels, and bars as well as high priced real estate. One of the most popular beaches in Miami Beach, South Beach is also right next door to the newly renovated South Pointe Park, where Miami Beach proper ends - or begins - depending on which way you are heading. With restroom amenities 20-foot-wide walkways lined with Florida limestone and restored natural sand dunes, covered with grass, children can play in spouting a spouting water exhibit to cool off. Check out an amazing sunset, sunrise or have a meal at one of the local eateries. There are surf shops with equipment rentals close by. Watch cruise ships set sail for an ocean voyage from the adjacent government cut channel, or head up the beach to 5th street and Ocean, where the fantastic art deco hotels line Ocean Drive. Rent a bike and cruise the boardwalk and take in great people watching, beach volleyball and people from all over the world having a blast.

*******************************************************************

Conocido por los lugareños como uno de los mejores lugares para tomar olas (pequeñas), la mundialmente famosa South Beach en el sensacional barrio de SOFI (al sur de la 5ta) en South Miami Beach, es el hogar de algunos de los mejores restaurantes, hoteles y bares de la zona, así como de bienes inmuebles de alto precio. Una de las playas más populares de Miami Beach, South Beach, también está justo al lado del parque South Pointe, recientemente renovado, donde Miami Beach termina o comienza apropiadamente dependiendo de hacia dónde se dirija. Con servicios de baños, pasarelas de 20 pies de ancho revestidas con piedra caliza de la Florida y dunas de arena natural restauradas, cubiertas de hierba, los niños pueden jugar en una exhibición de chorros de agua para refrescarse. Vea una increíble puesta de sol, el amanecer o disfrute de una comida en uno de los restaurantes locales. Hay tiendas de surf con alquiler de equipos cerca. Mire los cruceros zarpar para un viaje por mar desde el canal adyacente cortado por el gobierno, o diríjase a la playa hasta la calle 5 y Ocean, donde se encuentran los fantásticos hoteles art déco de Ocean Drive. Alquila una bicicleta y recorre el paseo marítimo y disfruta de la observación de la gente, el voleibol de playa y la gente de todo el mundo divirtiéndose.

Monitoring Frequency

South Point Park - Miami Beach is sampled weekly from January 1st to December 31st.

Source Information

Water quality results displayed is region are collected weekly (typically Mondays) by the Florida Department of Health’s (DOH) Florida Healthy Beaches (FHB) program (http://www.floridahealth.gov/environmental-health/beach-water-quality).

These sites are also sampled (typically Thursdays) by Surfrider Foundation Miami Chapter (https://miami.surfrider.org).

The information is updated on Swim Guide by Miami Waterkeeper (www.miamiwaterkeeper.org), a local nonprofit focused on ensuring clean water. Miami Waterkeeper enters Swim Guide data for both Miami-Dade County and Broward County’s DOH.

Analysis Protocol:
Samples are collected weekly to test for levels of enterococci, a type of bacteria that indicates that pathogenic bacteria and viruses associated with fecal pollution may be present. These bacteria are known as fecal indicator bacteria (FIB). Analysis of samples takes 24 hours to culture before results are available. All local sampling programs on Swim Guide also use the thresholds for water quality as written in the Florida Administrative Code, based on the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)’s 2012 Recreational Water Quality Criteria: Good= 0-35 CFU/MPN enterococci / 100 mL of marine water; Moderate= 36-69 CFU/MPN enterococci / 100 mL of marine water; and Poor= 70 CFU/MPN or greater enterococci / 100 mL of marine water. Clicking the pie chart icon will reveal a summary of the prior yearly or monthly of pass/fail data. A sampling location is marked GREY when no current or reliable monitoring information is available.

Testing sites are resampled by DOH after a failed water quality test until conditions return to safe levels. The DOH will only issue a formal “swim advisory” after two failed tests in a row, but Miami Waterkeeper will mark a beach as “RED” on Swim Guide after a single failed test is reported by any of the sampling organizations, if the data is posted by DOH. These conservative advisories inform vulnerable people (children, elderly, and the immunocompromised) who have elevated health risks due to water quality at the beach.

Miami Waterkeeper will also mark a beach as "Special Status" if information comes from other sources indicating that the water is unsafe, for example, a sewage leak, red tide, or oil spill. If data is more than a week old, sites will show a historical record of water quality data from a given site.

Program Goals:
The Department of Health’s Florida Healthy Beaches program is a state-run initiative in partnership with Miami-Dade County and 33 other coastal counties in the state of Florida. The Florida Healthy Beaches program has been collecting and analyzing water samples from beaches and reporting FIB levels since 2000.

Surfrider Miami Chapter's program was designed to augment the water quality data of the Department of Health's Florida Healthy Beaches Program, which samples beaches within Miami Dade County each Monday. Surfrider Miami samples most of these same locations each Thursday, providing more up-to-date water quality information to protect public health at the beach, and provide data to local policy makers in an effort to alter public policy to improve water quality across the area.

Miami Waterkeeper’s Water Quality Monitoring program is run by full-time investigators and staff that sample common recreation sites on a weekly basis to ensure the water you love is clean and safe. This program aims to sample locations not currently sampled by the Florida Healthy Beaches program or Surfrider Miami in an attempt to fill in gaps in local water quality monitoring. Visit Miami Waterkeeper at www.miamiwaterkeeper.org/water_monitoring or email hello@miamiwaterkeeper.org if you have any additional questions or to view a complete set of monitoring data.

Read more
Water Quality Graph

  Beach Location Water Quality
Miami Beach, Florida
Miami, Florida
Miami Beach, Florida
Miami Beach, Florida
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