Dakwas Park Beach

Neah Bay, Washington
Managed by The Swim Guide

"Makah Recreational Use Permits: The Makah Tribe requires that all nonresident motor vehicles entering the Makah Nation for recreation purposes purchase a Recreational Use Permit. This permit may be purchased at many location throughout town."

Playground, views of the bay and marina.

Sand and cobble beach north of the last piers in Neah Bay.

The tribal senior center is at the north end of the beach.

WATER QUALITY
  • Passed water quality tests 60-95% of the time
  • Historical Status
  • This status is based on the latest sample, taken on . The Swim Guide updates the status of this beach as soon as test results become available. These results were posted to Swim Guide on at
For water quality icon legend, click:   
CURRENT WEATHER
8°C
A few clouds
MONITORING FREQUENCY

Dakwas Park Beach is sampled weekly from January 1st to December 31st

SOURCE INFORMATION

The Makah Tribe’s Beach Monitoring Program samples it’s beaches weekly. Most beaches are sampled year round except Warmhouse and Third beach which are sampled seasonally.

The Washington State BEACH Program collects fecal bacteria data on a weekly basis every Memorial Day through Labor Day at saltwater beaches, and at selected beaches throughout the winter. The Washington BEACH Program is led by the Washington State Departments of Ecology and Health. County and local agencies, tribal nations, and volunteers help to test water at beaches.

The BEACH Program monitors for enterococci. In addition to EPA’s enterococcus criteria, the Washington State Department of Ecology uses fecal coliform bacteria as an indicator to protect both shellfish and recreational water users.

Washington State adheres in part to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) bacteria level recommendations. The Washington State Department of Ecology uses three levels of water quality to determine which monitored beaches are safe for swimming. A first level beach contains less than 10 fecal coliform per 100 ml of water, determining that: "No fecal bacteria could be detected." A second level beach contains between 10 and 103 fecal coliform per 100 ml of water, indicating: "Some fecal bacteria were detected but the beach is still within EPA's water quality limits." A third level beach contains more than 103 fecal coliform per 100 ml of water, in which: "Fecal bacteria levels have exceeded EPA's water quality limits"

Water quality results and pollution events are communicated to the public by signs posted at the beach, a website, and a listserv.

WATER QUALITY GRAPH

Dakwas Park Beach

Neah Bay, Washington
Managed by The Swim Guide

WATER QUALITY
  • Passed water quality tests 60-95% of the time
  • Historical Status
  • This status is based on the latest sample, taken on . The Swim Guide updates the status of this beach as soon as test results become available. These results were posted to Swim Guide on at
For water quality icon legend, click:   
CURRENT WEATHER
8°C
A few clouds

"Makah Recreational Use Permits: The Makah Tribe requires that all nonresident motor vehicles entering the Makah Nation for recreation purposes purchase a Recreational Use Permit. This permit may be purchased at many location throughout town."

Playground, views of the bay and marina.

Sand and cobble beach north of the last piers in Neah Bay.

The tribal senior center is at the north end of the beach.

MONITORING FREQUENCY

Dakwas Park Beach is sampled weekly from January 1st to December 31st

SOURCE INFORMATION

The Makah Tribe’s Beach Monitoring Program samples it’s beaches weekly. Most beaches are sampled year round except Warmhouse and Third beach which are sampled seasonally.

The Washington State BEACH Program collects fecal bacteria data on a weekly basis every Memorial Day through Labor Day at saltwater beaches, and at selected beaches throughout the winter. The Washington BEACH Program is led by the Washington State Departments of Ecology and Health. County and local agencies, tribal nations, and volunteers help to test water at beaches.

The BEACH Program monitors for enterococci. In addition to EPA’s enterococcus criteria, the Washington State Department of Ecology uses fecal coliform bacteria as an indicator to protect both shellfish and recreational water users.

Washington State adheres in part to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) bacteria level recommendations. The Washington State Department of Ecology uses three levels of water quality to determine which monitored beaches are safe for swimming. A first level beach contains less than 10 fecal coliform per 100 ml of water, determining that: "No fecal bacteria could be detected." A second level beach contains between 10 and 103 fecal coliform per 100 ml of water, indicating: "Some fecal bacteria were detected but the beach is still within EPA's water quality limits." A third level beach contains more than 103 fecal coliform per 100 ml of water, in which: "Fecal bacteria levels have exceeded EPA's water quality limits"

Water quality results and pollution events are communicated to the public by signs posted at the beach, a website, and a listserv.

WATER QUALITY GRAPH



Swim Guide shares the best information we have at the moment you ask for it. Always obey signs at the beach or advisories from official government agencies. Stay alert and check for other swimming hazards such as dangerous currents and tides. Please report your pollution concerns so Affiliates can help keep other beach-goers safe.

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