Grimsby Beach

Grimsby, Ontario

Grimsby Beach connects you to Lake Ontario's past. From the beach, you can still see the pilings from a pier where ferries from Hamilton and Toronto used to dock. People flocked to this beach for good times for the first half of the 20th Century. The Hamilton district of the Methodist Church group opened Grimsby Park in 1846. In 1910, Harry Wylie purchased the park to build carousels, a motion picture theater, and a "Figure 8" roller coaster. Canada Steamship Lines bought the park in 1916, but its popularity fell after fires consumed many of its wooden buildings. From the 1920s to the 1950s, park attractions gradually closed and developers bought up land to build cottages. With its fragile thread of history, Grimsby Beach is a perfect place for boating, fishing, walking, beach volleyball and admiring the sunset.

WATER QUALITY
  • No data available
  • Current Status
  • This status is based on the latest sample, taken on August 28th, 2017. Lake Ontario Waterkeeper updates the status of this beach as soon as test results become available. These results were posted to Swim Guide on at
For water quality icon legend, click:   
CURRENT WEATHER
14°C
A mix of sun and clouds
MONITORING FREQUENCY

Grimsby Beach is not sampled

SOURCE INFORMATION

The Niagara Region Public Health Department monitors recreational water quality at sites in this region. Sampling season starts Victoria Day Weekend and ends Labour Day Weekend.

Water at all sites is sampled for E. coli and Total coliform at all sites.

Niagara Region's Public Health Department issues beach advisories when the geometric mean concentration of at least five samples is at least 200 E. coli / 100 mL of water or when a single sample is at least 400 E. coli / 100 mL of water.

This guideline comes from Canada’s Guidelines for Canadian Recreational Water Quality (2012). It is applied to beaches in Ontario in accordance with Ontario’s Recreational Water Protocol, 2018.

Prior to 2018 beaches in Ontario were posted when the geometric mean of 5 samples collected within a 30-day period exceeded 100 E. coli / 100 mL of water.

Water samples are collected weekly at minimum. Results are posted to Swim Guide when they are available online. Results do not reflect date sample was taken. Results are also available at https://www.niagararegion.ca/living/water/beaches/default.aspx.

In Swim Guide, a beach is marked Green when the geometric mean of at least 5 samples is below 200 E.coli / 100 mL water and each individual sample concentration is below 400 E.coli / 100 mL.

A beach is marked Red when the results are equal to or above a geometric mean of 200 E.coli / 100 mL water and/or 400 E.coli / 100 mL.

A beach is marked Grey when there are no current results or there is no available information.

DISCLAIMER:

Historical data from 2017 and prior reflect the previous Ontario standard of a geometric mean of ≤ 100 E. coli /100 mL.

Historical data from 2018 onward reflect the new Ontario Operational Approaches for Recreational Water Guideline, 2018: Geometric mean concentration ≤ 200 E. coli/ 100 mL and single-sample maximum concentration of ≤ 400 E. coli /100 mL.

WATER QUALITY GRAPH

Grimsby Beach

Grimsby, Ontario

WATER QUALITY
  • No data available
  • Current Status
  • This status is based on the latest sample, taken on August 28th, 2017. Lake Ontario Waterkeeper updates the status of this beach as soon as test results become available. These results were posted to Swim Guide on at
For water quality icon legend, click:   
CURRENT WEATHER
14°C
A mix of sun and clouds

Grimsby Beach connects you to Lake Ontario's past. From the beach, you can still see the pilings from a pier where ferries from Hamilton and Toronto used to dock. People flocked to this beach for good times for the first half of the 20th Century. The Hamilton district of the Methodist Church group opened Grimsby Park in 1846. In 1910, Harry Wylie purchased the park to build carousels, a motion picture theater, and a "Figure 8" roller coaster. Canada Steamship Lines bought the park in 1916, but its popularity fell after fires consumed many of its wooden buildings. From the 1920s to the 1950s, park attractions gradually closed and developers bought up land to build cottages. With its fragile thread of history, Grimsby Beach is a perfect place for boating, fishing, walking, beach volleyball and admiring the sunset.

MONITORING FREQUENCY

Grimsby Beach is not sampled

SOURCE INFORMATION

The Niagara Region Public Health Department monitors recreational water quality at sites in this region. Sampling season starts Victoria Day Weekend and ends Labour Day Weekend.

Water at all sites is sampled for E. coli and Total coliform at all sites.

Niagara Region's Public Health Department issues beach advisories when the geometric mean concentration of at least five samples is at least 200 E. coli / 100 mL of water or when a single sample is at least 400 E. coli / 100 mL of water.

This guideline comes from Canada’s Guidelines for Canadian Recreational Water Quality (2012). It is applied to beaches in Ontario in accordance with Ontario’s Recreational Water Protocol, 2018.

Prior to 2018 beaches in Ontario were posted when the geometric mean of 5 samples collected within a 30-day period exceeded 100 E. coli / 100 mL of water.

Water samples are collected weekly at minimum. Results are posted to Swim Guide when they are available online. Results do not reflect date sample was taken. Results are also available at https://www.niagararegion.ca/living/water/beaches/default.aspx.

In Swim Guide, a beach is marked Green when the geometric mean of at least 5 samples is below 200 E.coli / 100 mL water and each individual sample concentration is below 400 E.coli / 100 mL.

A beach is marked Red when the results are equal to or above a geometric mean of 200 E.coli / 100 mL water and/or 400 E.coli / 100 mL.

A beach is marked Grey when there are no current results or there is no available information.

DISCLAIMER:

Historical data from 2017 and prior reflect the previous Ontario standard of a geometric mean of ≤ 100 E. coli /100 mL.

Historical data from 2018 onward reflect the new Ontario Operational Approaches for Recreational Water Guideline, 2018: Geometric mean concentration ≤ 200 E. coli/ 100 mL and single-sample maximum concentration of ≤ 400 E. coli /100 mL.

WATER QUALITY GRAPH



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