Deer Creek @ Experimental Forest Research Station

Otis, Oregon

What is an Experimental Forest? Come explore the Cascade Head Experimental Forest and find out for yourself...or review this synopis from the US Forest Service on this unique designation.

"The 11,890-acre Cascade Head Experimental Forest was established in 1934 for scientific study of typical coastal Sitka spruce-western hemlock forests found along the Oregon Coast. The forest stands at Cascade Head have been used for long-term studies, experimentation, and ecosystem research since then. In 1974 an act of Congress established the 9,670-acre Cascade Head Scenic Research Area that includes the western half of the experimental forest (see map), several prairie headlands, the Salmon River estuary to the south, and contiguous private lands. Direction for the Scenic Research Area encourages scientific study while promoting a sensitive relationship between humans and their environment. The combination of the two areas has resulted in a more diverse and coastal related research program. In 1980 the entire area was designated a Biosphere Reserve as part of the United Nations Biosphere Reserve system.

"The variety of ecosystems here are home to more than 350 species of wildlife. There are four federally listed endangered species that either use or inhabit the Cascade Head area: spotted owl, marbled murrelet, coho salmon, and Oregon silver spot butterfly. Two major prairie headlands jut out into the Pacific Ocean. The recently restored Salmon River estuary provides a critical juncture between fresh and salt water, supports numerous forms of life, and maintains staging areas for upstream spawning migrations of anadromous fish and rearing areas for juveniles and smolts. The forested ecosystems include very productive young and mature (150 year-old) stands of Sitka spruce-western hemlock and Douglas fir forests with riparian areas and stream banks dominated by red alder.

"The Siuslaw National Forest and the Pacific Northwest Research Station of the USDA Forest Service manage the experimental forest and scenic research area jointly. Research partners include The Nature Conservancy, state and private universities in Oregon and Washington, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Oregon Department of Agriculture, National Aeronautic and Space Administration, Environmental Protection Agency, and National Marine Fisheries Service."

FMI: https://www.fs.fed.us/pnw/exforests/cascade-head/

WATER QUALITY
  • No data available
  • Historical Status
  • This status is based on the latest sample, taken on . Salmon Drift ​Creek Watershed Council​ updates the status of this beach as soon as test results become available. These results were posted to Swim Guide on at
For water quality icon legend, click:   
MONITORING FREQUENCY

Deer Creek @ Experimental Forest Research Station is sampled bi-weekly from January 1st to December 31st

SOURCE INFORMATION

The Salmon Drift Creek Watershed Council (SDCWC) has been collecting water samples since 2006 the Salmon Drift Watershed. ​The watersheds are home to the Coho Salmon, a threatened species, and are designated "Essential Salmon Habitat" by Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. The sites that are sampled include the Salmon River, Devils Lake, ​Drift Creek, and Schooner Creek and their tributaries.

The outfall for each of these water bodies is ultimately the Pacific Ocean, and thus impacts to the beach water quality may be a result of upstream activities.
Water samples are collected by the Watershed Council with the help of volunteers. The Water Quality Program Manager oversees and coordinates with all the volunteers, and provides training to new volunteers. ​

Samples are processed using the IDEXX system. The water at the bathing beaches are tested for E.coli, as well as dissolved oxygen, temperature, pH, specific conductance, and turbidity.

The monitoring program runs year round. Samples are collected bi-weekly. Every other Wednesday, samples are collect. As results become available they are shared on Swim Guide.

Water Quality Data are compared to state and federal standards as part of a baseline monitoring program. SDCWC does not issue any advisories, but information is available for public's use.

Monitoring Status
SDCWC follows Oregon’s standard for the monitoring of its recreational waters. The 30 day standard is > 126 cfu / 100 ml or any one sample (STV) at > 406 cfu /100ml. Effectively a swim site will be posted based on the single sample criteria of 406 E.coli/100ml. The 90 day segment is still only proposed and has not to my understanding been adopted.

E. coli
A beach is marked Green when two consecutive single sample results are under an STV of 406 cfu per 100 mL (and where applicable, a geometric mean of 126 cfu per 100 mL)

A beach is marked Red when five consecutive single sample results in a 30 day period are equal to or above an STV of 406 cfu per 100 mL (and where applicable, a geometric mean of 126 cfu per 100 mL)

A beach is marked Grey if there is no current results or no available information.

SDCWC is currently supported by the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, Surfrider Blue Water Task Force, and Neighbors For Kids in Depoe Bay, Oregon where their bacteria lab resides.

WATER QUALITY GRAPH

Deer Creek @ Experimental Forest Research Station

Otis, Oregon

WATER QUALITY
  • No data available
  • Historical Status
  • This status is based on the latest sample, taken on . Salmon Drift ​Creek Watershed Council​ updates the status of this beach as soon as test results become available. These results were posted to Swim Guide on at
For water quality icon legend, click:   

What is an Experimental Forest? Come explore the Cascade Head Experimental Forest and find out for yourself...or review this synopis from the US Forest Service on this unique designation.

"The 11,890-acre Cascade Head Experimental Forest was established in 1934 for scientific study of typical coastal Sitka spruce-western hemlock forests found along the Oregon Coast. The forest stands at Cascade Head have been used for long-term studies, experimentation, and ecosystem research since then. In 1974 an act of Congress established the 9,670-acre Cascade Head Scenic Research Area that includes the western half of the experimental forest (see map), several prairie headlands, the Salmon River estuary to the south, and contiguous private lands. Direction for the Scenic Research Area encourages scientific study while promoting a sensitive relationship between humans and their environment. The combination of the two areas has resulted in a more diverse and coastal related research program. In 1980 the entire area was designated a Biosphere Reserve as part of the United Nations Biosphere Reserve system.

"The variety of ecosystems here are home to more than 350 species of wildlife. There are four federally listed endangered species that either use or inhabit the Cascade Head area: spotted owl, marbled murrelet, coho salmon, and Oregon silver spot butterfly. Two major prairie headlands jut out into the Pacific Ocean. The recently restored Salmon River estuary provides a critical juncture between fresh and salt water, supports numerous forms of life, and maintains staging areas for upstream spawning migrations of anadromous fish and rearing areas for juveniles and smolts. The forested ecosystems include very productive young and mature (150 year-old) stands of Sitka spruce-western hemlock and Douglas fir forests with riparian areas and stream banks dominated by red alder.

"The Siuslaw National Forest and the Pacific Northwest Research Station of the USDA Forest Service manage the experimental forest and scenic research area jointly. Research partners include The Nature Conservancy, state and private universities in Oregon and Washington, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Oregon Department of Agriculture, National Aeronautic and Space Administration, Environmental Protection Agency, and National Marine Fisheries Service."

FMI: https://www.fs.fed.us/pnw/exforests/cascade-head/

MONITORING FREQUENCY

Deer Creek @ Experimental Forest Research Station is sampled bi-weekly from January 1st to December 31st

SOURCE INFORMATION

The Salmon Drift Creek Watershed Council (SDCWC) has been collecting water samples since 2006 the Salmon Drift Watershed. ​The watersheds are home to the Coho Salmon, a threatened species, and are designated "Essential Salmon Habitat" by Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. The sites that are sampled include the Salmon River, Devils Lake, ​Drift Creek, and Schooner Creek and their tributaries.

The outfall for each of these water bodies is ultimately the Pacific Ocean, and thus impacts to the beach water quality may be a result of upstream activities.
Water samples are collected by the Watershed Council with the help of volunteers. The Water Quality Program Manager oversees and coordinates with all the volunteers, and provides training to new volunteers. ​

Samples are processed using the IDEXX system. The water at the bathing beaches are tested for E.coli, as well as dissolved oxygen, temperature, pH, specific conductance, and turbidity.

The monitoring program runs year round. Samples are collected bi-weekly. Every other Wednesday, samples are collect. As results become available they are shared on Swim Guide.

Water Quality Data are compared to state and federal standards as part of a baseline monitoring program. SDCWC does not issue any advisories, but information is available for public's use.

Monitoring Status
SDCWC follows Oregon’s standard for the monitoring of its recreational waters. The 30 day standard is > 126 cfu / 100 ml or any one sample (STV) at > 406 cfu /100ml. Effectively a swim site will be posted based on the single sample criteria of 406 E.coli/100ml. The 90 day segment is still only proposed and has not to my understanding been adopted.

E. coli
A beach is marked Green when two consecutive single sample results are under an STV of 406 cfu per 100 mL (and where applicable, a geometric mean of 126 cfu per 100 mL)

A beach is marked Red when five consecutive single sample results in a 30 day period are equal to or above an STV of 406 cfu per 100 mL (and where applicable, a geometric mean of 126 cfu per 100 mL)

A beach is marked Grey if there is no current results or no available information.

SDCWC is currently supported by the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, Surfrider Blue Water Task Force, and Neighbors For Kids in Depoe Bay, Oregon where their bacteria lab resides.

WATER QUALITY GRAPH



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