Darwin Beach at the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science - Miami Waterkeeper

Miami, Florida

This site is sponsored by Zoo Miami, a proud partner of Miami Waterkeeper.

The University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences is one of the world's premier centers of marine and atmospheric research. Founded in 1943 as the University of Miami's Marine Laboratory, it became an independent school and named in honor of Lewis and Dorothy Rosenstiel in recognition of a major contribution of the couple.

Though the campus is private property, Darwin Beach sits on the southeastern edge of the campus, and is accessible through the Wetlab, an on-campus bar open to the public from 5 pm until close.

COVID-19

Keep your distance from other people.

Practicing social distancing is essential right now. Follow the advice of the health experts. If your community has asked that you remain indoors and away from others, do so. Heading to the beach should only be considered an option if social distancing practices can be followed. Spending a day in any crowded place is the worst thing we can do for our most vulnerable right now and will counter the efforts to curb the virus’ spread.

For more information, please visit the World Health Organization public resource on COVID-19.

Water Quality
  • Meets water quality standards

  • Current Status
  • This status is based on the latest sample, taken on July 28th, 2020. Miami Waterkeeper updates the status of this beach as soon as test results become available. These results were posted to Swim Guide on July 29th, 2020 at 5:51 PM.
For water quality icon legend, click:  
Monitoring Frequency

Darwin Beach at the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science - Miami Waterkeeper is sampled weekly from January 1st to December 31st.

Source Information

Miami Waterkeeper (www.miamiwaterkeeper.org), a local nonprofit focused on ensuring clean water, enters Swim Guide data for Miami-Dade and Broward Counties. Water quality results displayed at this location were collected by Miami Waterkeeper’s weekly Water Quality Monitoring program. Samples are collected on Mondays with results available Tuesdays. Miami Waterkeeper may resample a beach on subsequent days if a water quality issue is detected.




Miami Waterkeeper collects weekly recreational water samples to test for levels of enterococci, a type of bacteria that indicates that pathogenic bacteria and viruses associated with fecal pollution may be present. These bacteria are known as fecal indicator bacteria (FIB). Analysis of samples takes 24 hours to culture before results are available. All local sampling programs on Swim Guide also use the thresholds for water quality as written in the Florida Administrative Code, based on the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)’s 2012 Recreational Water Quality Criteria: Good= 0-35 CFU/MPN enterococci / 100 mL of marine water; Moderate= 36-69 CFU/MPN enterococci / 100 mL of marine water; and Poor= 70 CFU/MPN or greater enterococci / 100 mL of marine water. Swim Guide uses a color system to quickly indicate water quality; green=Good, yellow=Moderate, and red=Poor. Clicking the pie chart icon will reveal a summary of the prior yearly or monthly pass/fail data. A sampling location is marked GREY when no current or reliable monitoring information is available.

Miami Waterkeeper will mark a beach as “RED” on Swim Guide after a single failed test is reported. These conservative advisories inform vulnerable people (children, elderly, and the immunocompromised) who have elevated health risks due to water quality at the beach.
Miami Waterkeeper will also mark a beach as "Special Status" if information comes from other sources indicating that the water is unsafe, for example, a sewage leak, red tide, or oil spill. If data is more than a week old, sites will show a historical record of water quality data from a given site.




Miami Waterkeeper’s Water Quality Monitoring program is run by full-time investigators and staff that sample common recreation sites on a weekly basis to keep you informed about your local water quality. This program aims to sample locations not currently sampled by the Florida Healthy Beaches (FHB) program in an attempt to fill in gaps in local water quality monitoring. Visit Miami Waterkeeper at www.miamiwaterkeeper.org/water_monitoring or email hello@miamiwaterkeeper.org if you have any additional questions or to view a complete set of monitoring data.

Water Quality Graph

Darwin Beach at the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science - Miami Waterkeeper

Miami, Florida

COVID-19

Keep your distance from other people.

Practicing social distancing is essential right now. Follow the advice of the health experts. If your community has asked that you remain indoors and away from others, do so. Heading to the beach should only be considered an option if social distancing practices can be followed. Spending a day in any crowded place is the worst thing we can do for our most vulnerable right now and will counter the efforts to curb the virus’ spread.

For more information, please visit the World Health Organization public resource on COVID-19.

Water Quality
  • Meets water quality standards
  • Current Status
  • This status is based on the latest sample, taken on July 28th, 2020. Miami Waterkeeper updates the status of this beach as soon as test results become available. These results were posted to Swim Guide on July 29th, 2020 at 5:51 PM.
For water quality icon legend, click:  

This site is sponsored by Zoo Miami, a proud partner of Miami Waterkeeper.

The University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences is one of the world's premier centers of marine and atmospheric research. Founded in 1943 as the University of Miami's Marine Laboratory, it became an independent school and named in honor of Lewis and Dorothy Rosenstiel in recognition of a major contribution of the couple.

Though the campus is private property, Darwin Beach sits on the southeastern edge of the campus, and is accessible through the Wetlab, an on-campus bar open to the public from 5 pm until close.

Monitoring Frequency

Darwin Beach at the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science - Miami Waterkeeper is sampled weekly from January 1st to December 31st.

Source Information

Miami Waterkeeper (www.miamiwaterkeeper.org), a local nonprofit focused on ensuring clean water, enters Swim Guide data for Miami-Dade and Broward Counties. Water quality results displayed at this location were collected by Miami Waterkeeper’s weekly Water Quality Monitoring program. Samples are collected on Mondays with results available Tuesdays. Miami Waterkeeper may resample a beach on subsequent days if a water quality issue is detected.




Miami Waterkeeper collects weekly recreational water samples to test for levels of enterococci, a type of bacteria that indicates that pathogenic bacteria and viruses associated with fecal pollution may be present. These bacteria are known as fecal indicator bacteria (FIB). Analysis of samples takes 24 hours to culture before results are available. All local sampling programs on Swim Guide also use the thresholds for water quality as written in the Florida Administrative Code, based on the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)’s 2012 Recreational Water Quality Criteria: Good= 0-35 CFU/MPN enterococci / 100 mL of marine water; Moderate= 36-69 CFU/MPN enterococci / 100 mL of marine water; and Poor= 70 CFU/MPN or greater enterococci / 100 mL of marine water. Swim Guide uses a color system to quickly indicate water quality; green=Good, yellow=Moderate, and red=Poor. Clicking the pie chart icon will reveal a summary of the prior yearly or monthly pass/fail data. A sampling location is marked GREY when no current or reliable monitoring information is available.

Miami Waterkeeper will mark a beach as “RED” on Swim Guide after a single failed test is reported. These conservative advisories inform vulnerable people (children, elderly, and the immunocompromised) who have elevated health risks due to water quality at the beach.
Miami Waterkeeper will also mark a beach as "Special Status" if information comes from other sources indicating that the water is unsafe, for example, a sewage leak, red tide, or oil spill. If data is more than a week old, sites will show a historical record of water quality data from a given site.




Miami Waterkeeper’s Water Quality Monitoring program is run by full-time investigators and staff that sample common recreation sites on a weekly basis to keep you informed about your local water quality. This program aims to sample locations not currently sampled by the Florida Healthy Beaches (FHB) program in an attempt to fill in gaps in local water quality monitoring. Visit Miami Waterkeeper at www.miamiwaterkeeper.org/water_monitoring or email hello@miamiwaterkeeper.org if you have any additional questions or to view a complete set of monitoring data.

Water Quality Graph

  Beach Location Water Quality
Miami, Florida
Key Biscayne, Florida
Key Biscayne, Florida
Miami, Florida
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