Seba Beach on Wabamun Lake


This beach in the summer village of Seba Beach is one of north central Alberta’s oldest and most popular resort areas. Especially on the August long weekend for the Regatta celebrations. The name was apparently chosen by postal officials, and it may have been taken after Seba, son of Cush from Genesis 10:7. The beach is long and sandy and has day use amenities nearby. The public beach area is small with a playground. The water is shallow and usually clear on the West side of this large recreational lake. The swimming area for the public beach is nestled between 2 public docks. Seba has an excellent fireworks display and silly parade on the August long weekend. Parking is the near the large pier and most of the public beach is sandwiched between cottages on either side. Wabamun was the site of a CN Train derailment close to the Town of Wabamun on the Northeastern side of the lake. Toxic chemicals were spilled into the lake but recent water quality monitoring has revealed the lake is safe for swimming and recreation. The water levels of the lake have stayed consistent because of an agreement with the nearby power generation companies and Alberta Government to pump water back into the lake.

QUALITÉ DE L’EAU
  • Aucune donnée actuelle
  • Statut Spécial
  • This status is based on the latest sample, taken on . North Saskatchewan Riverkeeper updates the status of this beach as soon as test results become available. These results were posted to Swim Guide on à
Légende de qualité de l’eau:   
MÉTÉO ACTUELLE
0°C
les éclaircies et les nuages se partagent le ciel
FRÉQUENCE DE SURVEILLANCE

La qualité de l’eau de cette plage n’est pas vérifiée

SOURCES

Alberta Health Services (AHS) monitors freshwater beaches across the province in five zones: North, Edmonton, Central, Calgary, and South. Water samples at this beach are collected by AHS staff and processed in environmental labs.

This site is usually sampled on a weekly basis for thermotolerant coliforms and at varying frequencies for cyanobacteria and microcystins (blue-green algae) during the summer months.

Water quality is monitored in accordance with standards outlined in a previous version of the General Nuisance and Sanitation Regulation, under Alberta’s Public Health Act. New standards are currently being developed.

Thermotolerant coliforms serve as an indicator of faecal contamination, which poses a human health risk. Guidelines recommend that a water quality advisory be posted when tests for thermotolerant coliforms over the preceding 30 days produce results with a geometric mean greater than 200 colony forming units per 100 millilitres of water (200 CFU/100ml). An advisory may also be issued when any single sample exceeds 400 CFU/100ml, although this may first lead to further investigation.

When a Water Quality Advisory is issued, a notice is erected at the beach indicating that the location is unfit for swimming or bathing. In addition, a Water Quality Advisory is issued through the AHS website, local media, and Swim Guide. Swim Guide posts all advisories that are announced, but due to data sharing challenges, is not able to make updates when test results are within the guidelines. Therefore, the swim icon will appear grey, and any posted advisories will appear on the beach page. An advisory is rescinded once water quality meets the above standards.

In addition to thermotolerant coliforms, AHS monitors blue-green algae throughout the swimming season. Algal blooms are monitored through visual observation and through testing for cyanobacteria and microcystins (toxins produced by blue-green algae).

AHS issues a Blue-Green Algae Advisory when a bloom is identified. Advisories are posted online to www.albertahealthservices.ca/1926.asp, circulated by local media, and posted to Swim Guide. Appropriate signage is posted around the water body (public beaches, access points, campgrounds, etc). These advisories remain in place for the duration that the health risk persists.

QUALITÉ DE L’EAU

Seba Beach on Wabamun Lake


QUALITÉ DE L’EAU
  • Aucune donnée actuelle
  • Statut Spécial
  • This status is based on the latest sample, taken on . North Saskatchewan Riverkeeper updates the status of this beach as soon as test results become available. These results were posted to Swim Guide on à
Légende de qualité de l’eau:   
MÉTÉO ACTUELLE
0°C
les éclaircies et les nuages se partagent le ciel

This beach in the summer village of Seba Beach is one of north central Alberta’s oldest and most popular resort areas. Especially on the August long weekend for the Regatta celebrations. The name was apparently chosen by postal officials, and it may have been taken after Seba, son of Cush from Genesis 10:7. The beach is long and sandy and has day use amenities nearby. The public beach area is small with a playground. The water is shallow and usually clear on the West side of this large recreational lake. The swimming area for the public beach is nestled between 2 public docks. Seba has an excellent fireworks display and silly parade on the August long weekend. Parking is the near the large pier and most of the public beach is sandwiched between cottages on either side. Wabamun was the site of a CN Train derailment close to the Town of Wabamun on the Northeastern side of the lake. Toxic chemicals were spilled into the lake but recent water quality monitoring has revealed the lake is safe for swimming and recreation. The water levels of the lake have stayed consistent because of an agreement with the nearby power generation companies and Alberta Government to pump water back into the lake.

FRÉQUENCE DE SURVEILLANCE

La qualité de l’eau de cette plage n’est pas vérifiée

SOURCES

Alberta Health Services (AHS) monitors freshwater beaches across the province in five zones: North, Edmonton, Central, Calgary, and South. Water samples at this beach are collected by AHS staff and processed in environmental labs.

This site is usually sampled on a weekly basis for thermotolerant coliforms and at varying frequencies for cyanobacteria and microcystins (blue-green algae) during the summer months.

Water quality is monitored in accordance with standards outlined in a previous version of the General Nuisance and Sanitation Regulation, under Alberta’s Public Health Act. New standards are currently being developed.

Thermotolerant coliforms serve as an indicator of faecal contamination, which poses a human health risk. Guidelines recommend that a water quality advisory be posted when tests for thermotolerant coliforms over the preceding 30 days produce results with a geometric mean greater than 200 colony forming units per 100 millilitres of water (200 CFU/100ml). An advisory may also be issued when any single sample exceeds 400 CFU/100ml, although this may first lead to further investigation.

When a Water Quality Advisory is issued, a notice is erected at the beach indicating that the location is unfit for swimming or bathing. In addition, a Water Quality Advisory is issued through the AHS website, local media, and Swim Guide. Swim Guide posts all advisories that are announced, but due to data sharing challenges, is not able to make updates when test results are within the guidelines. Therefore, the swim icon will appear grey, and any posted advisories will appear on the beach page. An advisory is rescinded once water quality meets the above standards.

In addition to thermotolerant coliforms, AHS monitors blue-green algae throughout the swimming season. Algal blooms are monitored through visual observation and through testing for cyanobacteria and microcystins (toxins produced by blue-green algae).

AHS issues a Blue-Green Algae Advisory when a bloom is identified. Advisories are posted online to www.albertahealthservices.ca/1926.asp, circulated by local media, and posted to Swim Guide. Appropriate signage is posted around the water body (public beaches, access points, campgrounds, etc). These advisories remain in place for the duration that the health risk persists.

QUALITÉ DE L’EAU



Swim Guide divulgue les meilleures données que nous possédons au moment où vous voulez les consulter. Obéissez toujours aux avis affichés sur les plages ou diffusés par les organismes gouvernementaux. Restez vigilant et vérifiez s’il y a d’autres risques pour les baigneurs, comme les marées et les courants dangereux. Veuillez signaler les cas de pollution qui vous préoccupent pour que les affiliés puissent assurer la sécurité des personnes qui fréquentent les plages.

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