Sir Wilfred Laurier Park – Boat Launch

Edmonton, Alberta

Sir Wilfred Laurier Park is located just upstream of downtown Edmonton and provides access to a popular boat launch. The park sits on what used to be a tent city that was home to a community of coal workers. Adjacent the park is the Edmonton Valley Zoo and in addition to abundant green space, there is a short stretch of sand along the river by the boat launch. Just down the path you will find Buena Vista Park, the Edmonton Rowing Club, and a pedestrian bridge that crosses the river to Hawrelak Park.

It is not uncommon to see swimmers by the sandy area next to the bridge. If you are considering a swim in the river, first ensure that the conditions are suitable and be advised that the presence of E. coli is only one of several factors that should be considered before entering the water. For tips on safe swimming in the North Saskatchewan River visit www.saskriverkeeper.ca.

Ammenities:
Boat launch with concrete ramp
Boat trailer parking
Accessible parking
Accessible washrooms
Abundant green space
Picnic sites
Hiking and biking trails
Ball diamonds

Directions:
Access via Buena Vista Rd and continue past the Edmonton Valley Zoo. All vehicles except those with boat trailers must proceed to the right and follow the loop road through the park.

WATER QUALITY
  • Met water quality standards less than 60% of the time
  • Historical Status
  • This status is based on the latest sample, taken on . North Saskatchewan Riverkeeper updates the status of this beach as soon as test results become available. These results were posted to Swim Guide on at
For water quality icon legend, click:   
MONITORING FREQUENCY

Sir Wilfred Laurier Park – Boat Launch is sampled weekly from July 18th to October 1st

SOURCE INFORMATION

North Saskatchewan Riverkeeper monitors 3 locations in this region on a weekly basis. The North Saskatchewan River runs from its headwaters in the Rocky Mountains to its confluence with the South Saskatchewan River near Prince Alberta. The river is highly popular for canoeing, kayaking, paddleboarding, power boating, fishing, and in some places swimming too.

Water quality tests are conducted in-house and by a third party environmental lab, Exova. Testing is conducted for E. Coli, which is a bacteria indicator of fecal contamination. Recreational water quality guidelines are established federally and advise caution when acute bacteria levels exceed 400 colony forming units per 100 millilitres of water.

Swimmers are advised that E. coli levels are only one of many parameters that should be carefully considered before entering the water. The E. coli data shared here is intended to serve as a helpful reference point and Swim Guide users are reminded that water quality changes quickly in moving water. As such, the data available on Swim Guide reflects water quality at the time of sampling only. In addition to E. coli levels, several other factors can affect the level of risk inherent to swimming activities. These include but are not limited to: flow levels, turbidity, intensity of recent rainfall, runoff volumes, and land use activities upstream.

In addition to water quality considerations, other physical risks are inherent to river activities including powerful currents, floating debris (such as large logs), swimming ability, and powered watercraft moving at high speeds. Because swimming and all water recreation activities involve inherent risks, North Saskatchewan Riverkeeper cannot assume liability for any injuries or damages suffered as a result of water recreation activities.

North Saskatchewan Riverkeeper is a strong advocate for many forms of river recreation including swimming and aims to provide quality information that can help prepare river users for safe and enjoyable recreation.

The following is an outline of the protocols that support our river water quality monitoring program.

In-house lab:
Five sets of triplicate 1 millilitre samples are taken at each location. Coliscan easygel method is used to process the samples within 48 hours. Triplicates are averaged and the geometric mean is calculated for the five sets of samples. A beach is posted red if the geometric mean exceeds 400 CFU per 100 millilitres of water. If a beach is equal or below this threshold it is posted green.

Third party environmental lab (Exova):
Five 100 millilitre samples are submitted for each beach. Membrane filtration is used to calculate the number of E. coli colony forming units per 100 millilitres of water. A beach is posted if the geometric mean exceeds 400 CFU per 100 millilitres of water.

The private lab, Exova, is currently used in order to help establish the NSRK's in house lab. The data from Exova is currently used for our official results. Results are published as soon as they are available, usually within 48 hours of sampling.

Questions regarding these protocols can be directed to Hans Asfeldt at www.saskriverkeeper.ca/?page_id=287

WATER QUALITY GRAPH

Sir Wilfred Laurier Park – Boat Launch

Edmonton, Alberta

WATER QUALITY
  • Met water quality standards less than 60% of the time
  • Historical Status
  • This status is based on the latest sample, taken on . North Saskatchewan Riverkeeper updates the status of this beach as soon as test results become available. These results were posted to Swim Guide on at
For water quality icon legend, click:   

Sir Wilfred Laurier Park is located just upstream of downtown Edmonton and provides access to a popular boat launch. The park sits on what used to be a tent city that was home to a community of coal workers. Adjacent the park is the Edmonton Valley Zoo and in addition to abundant green space, there is a short stretch of sand along the river by the boat launch. Just down the path you will find Buena Vista Park, the Edmonton Rowing Club, and a pedestrian bridge that crosses the river to Hawrelak Park.

It is not uncommon to see swimmers by the sandy area next to the bridge. If you are considering a swim in the river, first ensure that the conditions are suitable and be advised that the presence of E. coli is only one of several factors that should be considered before entering the water. For tips on safe swimming in the North Saskatchewan River visit www.saskriverkeeper.ca.

Ammenities:
Boat launch with concrete ramp
Boat trailer parking
Accessible parking
Accessible washrooms
Abundant green space
Picnic sites
Hiking and biking trails
Ball diamonds

Directions:
Access via Buena Vista Rd and continue past the Edmonton Valley Zoo. All vehicles except those with boat trailers must proceed to the right and follow the loop road through the park.

MONITORING FREQUENCY

Sir Wilfred Laurier Park – Boat Launch is sampled weekly from July 18th to October 1st

SOURCE INFORMATION

North Saskatchewan Riverkeeper monitors 3 locations in this region on a weekly basis. The North Saskatchewan River runs from its headwaters in the Rocky Mountains to its confluence with the South Saskatchewan River near Prince Alberta. The river is highly popular for canoeing, kayaking, paddleboarding, power boating, fishing, and in some places swimming too.

Water quality tests are conducted in-house and by a third party environmental lab, Exova. Testing is conducted for E. Coli, which is a bacteria indicator of fecal contamination. Recreational water quality guidelines are established federally and advise caution when acute bacteria levels exceed 400 colony forming units per 100 millilitres of water.

Swimmers are advised that E. coli levels are only one of many parameters that should be carefully considered before entering the water. The E. coli data shared here is intended to serve as a helpful reference point and Swim Guide users are reminded that water quality changes quickly in moving water. As such, the data available on Swim Guide reflects water quality at the time of sampling only. In addition to E. coli levels, several other factors can affect the level of risk inherent to swimming activities. These include but are not limited to: flow levels, turbidity, intensity of recent rainfall, runoff volumes, and land use activities upstream.

In addition to water quality considerations, other physical risks are inherent to river activities including powerful currents, floating debris (such as large logs), swimming ability, and powered watercraft moving at high speeds. Because swimming and all water recreation activities involve inherent risks, North Saskatchewan Riverkeeper cannot assume liability for any injuries or damages suffered as a result of water recreation activities.

North Saskatchewan Riverkeeper is a strong advocate for many forms of river recreation including swimming and aims to provide quality information that can help prepare river users for safe and enjoyable recreation.

The following is an outline of the protocols that support our river water quality monitoring program.

In-house lab:
Five sets of triplicate 1 millilitre samples are taken at each location. Coliscan easygel method is used to process the samples within 48 hours. Triplicates are averaged and the geometric mean is calculated for the five sets of samples. A beach is posted red if the geometric mean exceeds 400 CFU per 100 millilitres of water. If a beach is equal or below this threshold it is posted green.

Third party environmental lab (Exova):
Five 100 millilitre samples are submitted for each beach. Membrane filtration is used to calculate the number of E. coli colony forming units per 100 millilitres of water. A beach is posted if the geometric mean exceeds 400 CFU per 100 millilitres of water.

The private lab, Exova, is currently used in order to help establish the NSRK's in house lab. The data from Exova is currently used for our official results. Results are published as soon as they are available, usually within 48 hours of sampling.

Questions regarding these protocols can be directed to Hans Asfeldt at www.saskriverkeeper.ca/?page_id=287

WATER QUALITY GRAPH



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